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India

From Raj to Republic: Sovereignty, Violence, and Democracy in India

Sunil Purushotham
Stanford University Press
2021

The 1947 Partition of India: Irish Parellels

Author(s): 
Deirdre McMahon
Publisher/Sponsor: 
History Ireland
www.jstor.org/stable/27823028

From the Ashes of 1947: Reimagining Punjab

Pippa Virdee
Cambridge University Press
2018

The Punjab Borderland: Mobility, Materiality and Militancy, 1947–1987

Ilyas Chattha
Cambridge University Press
2022

Problems of Violence, States of Terror: Torture in Colonial India

Author(s): 
Anupama Rao
Publisher/Sponsor: 
Taylor and Francis Online
www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13698010120059609

Abstract: The 'discovery' of torture and its prevalence in the extraction of confessions produced a dilemma for the colonial state in India. Especially with the publication of the two-volume Report of the Commissioners for the Investigation of Alleged Cases of Torture in the Madras Presidency in 1855, colonial administrators became uncomfortably aware of the contrived nature of the 'truth' produced before magistrates and the police.

Kashmiriyat as Empty Signifier

Author(s): 
Neil Aggarwal
Publisher/Sponsor: 
Taylor and Francis Online
https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13698010802145150

Abstract: The disputed status of Jammu and Kashmir represents the unfinished business of the Partition of India and Pakistan. This essay examines how claims to Kashmir by India, Pakistan, the All Parties Hurriyat Conference (APHC) and the Kashmiri Pandits influence usage of the term ‘Kashmiriyat’ (i.e. the ethos of being Kashmiri). The term is frequently invoked with inconsistent meaning. Kashmiriyat is analysed, through linguistic and semiotic theories of the ‘empty signifier’, to identify which groups are present and absent within sociopolitical discourses.

The Persistence of Partitions: A Study of the Sindhi Hindus in India

Author(s): 
Rita Kothari
Publisher/Sponsor: 
Taylor and Francis Online
https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/1369801X.2011.597597

Abstract: This essay is based on my engagement with the Sindhi-speaking Hindu minority of Sindh that migrated to India in and around 1947, when the province of Sindh became a part of Pakistan. It privileges therefore a specific religious group and its response and negotiation to a specific moment. My current research on Sindhi-speaking Muslims along the border interrogates the classification of ‘Sindhis’ as a spatially fixed identity, and revisits the state-endorsed premises of irrevocability and border-formation.

Image And Representation: Stories Of Muslim Lives In India

Mushirul Hasan
M. Asaduddin
Oxford University Press
2002

Personal and National Destinies in Independent India: A Study of Selected Indian English Novels

Rositta Joseph Valiyamattam
Cambridge Scholars Publishing
2016

Visual Histories: Photography in the Popular Imagination

Malavika Karlekar
Oxford University Press
2013

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